The Housing Market in 2019

The last time we saw a balanced market was late 1990s, meaning many sellers and buyers have never seen a normal housing market.  Windermere Real Estate’s Chief Economist Matthew Gardner looks at more longer-term averages, what does he see for the future of the housing market?

 

Posted on May 23, 2019 at 5:23 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News, Matthew Gardner Reports | Tagged , , , , ,

The Q1 2019 Western Washington Gardner Report

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As Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, Matthew Gardner is responsible for analyzing and interpreting economic data and its impact on the real estate market on both a local and national level. Matthew has over 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K.

In addition to his day-to-day responsibilities, Matthew sits on the Washington State Governors Council of Economic Advisors; chairs the Board of Trustees at the Washington Center for Real Estate Research at the University of Washington; and is an Advisory Board Member at the Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies at the University of Washington where he also lectures in real estate economics.

Posted on April 25, 2019 at 7:00 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News, Matthew Gardner Reports | Tagged , , , , ,

Eastside Market Report | April 2019 | Provided by Denni Shefrin

 


After months of softening, home prices began to rise in February. That trend continued in March. While prices in most areas were down from the same time last year, they increased over the prior month. New listings rose as well, offering buyers more options and more time to make the right choice. Despite the uptick in listings, inventory is still under two months of supply, far short of the three to six months that is considered balanced.

Here are the full reports for Eastside Market Report, Seattle Market Report, Snohomish Market Report and King County Market Report!

 

 

 

Posted on April 16, 2019 at 3:03 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News | Tagged , , ,

Matthew Gardner 2019 Housing Forecast

Posted on March 31, 2019 at 11:42 am
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News, Matthew Gardner Reports | Tagged , , , ,

Scarce listings drive King County home prices to new highs

 

The median price of single-family homes sold in King County hit a new all-time high last month — $514,975 — amid record-low inventory, heralding even more intense bidding wars ahead in the typically busy spring home-buying season.

Ominously, the more affordable Snohomish and Pierce counties also face a historically low inventory level, according to a Seattle Times analysis of data from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service.

 

 

 

One widely-watched gauge of supply — the ratio of active listings to pending sales — hit its lowest level since at least 2003 in all three counties in February, according to the Times’ analysis. King and Snohomish counties each had less than a month’s supply, while Pierce had just over a month’s supply.

The historic shortage of homes for sale, combined with a recent drop in interest rates, has caused the dramatic run-up in prices, experts say. In February, King County had 1,923 homes listed for sale, the MLS reported, but a greater number of pending sales that hadn’t yet closed: 2,299.

“We cannot continue to sell more homes than we list,” said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate. “When are we going to start seeing some listings? That scares me more than anything else.”

Single-family home prices in the city of Seattle jumped 24 percent over the year to a median $644,950. Despite an older housing stock, Seattle is ground-zero for the region’s job growth.

Expedia and Weyerhaeuser are moving their suburban headquarters to Seattle. Amazon.com recently opened its new high-rise campus in South Lake Union. And Silicon Valley titans like Facebook and Apple have established satellite offices here.

This article originally appeared in the Seattle Times. To read more, click here.

Posted on March 24, 2016 at 3:51 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News | Tagged , , , ,

Seattle metro-area home prices up nearly 10 percent in a year

Seattle-area home prices surged in December, posting the fourth-highest annual gain among 20 metros, according to the S&P/Case-Shiller 20-city index released Tuesday.

The average price of existing single-family homes sold in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties climbed 9.9 percent over the year in December, its fastest pace in 2015. In the 20-city index, Seattle trailed only Portland (11.4 percent), San Francisco (10.3) and Denver (10.2) in annual price increases.

Nationally, prices in the 20-city index climbed 0.8 percent over the month in December, slowing a bit from a 1 percent increase in November. The index recorded a 5.7 percent annual gain.

Home prices in all but one city are rising faster than inflation, said David Blitzer, chairman of S&P’s index committee. Some might take that as a sign of trouble, especially given the stock market’s turmoil this year and the current age of this economic expansion.

“The recovery is 6 years old, but recoveries do not typically die of old age,” Blitzer said in a statement.

Higher home prices are encouraging builders: “Housing construction, like much of the economy, got off to a slow start in 2009-2010 and is only now beginning to show some serious strength,” he said.

Average prices in the Seattle metro area in December were less than 3 percent below the peak set in summer 2007, according to Case-Shiller data. The 20-city index is still about 12 percent off its 2006 peak.

Svenja Gudell, chief economist at Seattle-based Zillow, the real-estate website, said in a statement that the nation’s housing market faces a few challenges this spring: Low housing inventory is a factor in nearly every market now. Low oil prices are a drag on job growth in the Dakotas, Alaska and Texas. And the stronger U.S. dollar will affect demand from foreign buyers, while keeping mortgage-interest rates low.

This article originally appeared in the Seattle Times.

Posted on March 3, 2016 at 9:29 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Buying, Market News, Selling | Tagged , , , ,

No Need To Panic About Rising Interest Rates

 

This article originally appeared on Inman.com 

 

After seven years of some of the lowest interest rates in recorded history, the Federal Reserve has decided to raise the key Fed Funds Rate by 0.25 percent, which is causing some to be concerned that it will lead to a jump in mortgage rates and negatively impact the US housing market.

So, the question everyone wants to know is, do we need to worry about interest rates leaping?

While I expect there to be some volatility in rates for a while, I don’t believe the real estate market will implode in a rapidly rising interest rate environment. So, yes, interest rates are going to rise modestly, but no, I don’t think we need to be overly worried about it.

To qualify this statement, we need to understand that mortgage rates do not run in “lock-step” with the Fed Funds Rate. Although the Fed Funds Rate is a bellwether for the greater economic environment, there have been times when these two rates have moved in opposite directions, such as we saw in 2004/2005.

It’s also important to understand that while interest rates for revolving credit, such as credit cards and home equity loans, are tied to the Fed Funds Rate, non-revolving loans – like mortgages – are not. Mortgage rates are tied to bond yields – specifically the 10-year treasury.

So what do I think will happen?

I believe interest rates will rise above 4 percent, but we will not see a sharp spike in rates. The Fed has stated that any upward movement in the Fed Funds Rate will be slow and steady, and will reflect the greater economy. And I believe that mortgage rates will follow suit.  Additionally, mortgage rates have already moved higher in anticipation of an increase in the Fed Funds Rate.

That said, it is worth noting that any weakness in the global economy can actually have a downward effect on interest rates. This is referred to a “flight to quality”. In essence, investors seek safe haven during times of economic uncertainty. If markets outside the U.S. continue to underperform, there will likely be increasing demand for bonds which will drive up their price and drive down interest rates. Between China, the Eurozone, war in the Middle East, and a massive drop in oil prices, it's certainly possible that the price of mortgage backed securities could rise, leading U.S. mortgage rates lower.

Interest rates could not realistically stay at their current levels forever. But an increase should not be a great cause for concern. Yes, an increase makes mortgages more expensive, but not to a point where they will have a negative effect on home values. That said, the rate of home price growth will undoubtedly slow in the coming year, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

A little perspective might help: the average rate for a 30-year loan in the 1970’s was nine percent. It was 13 percent in the 1980’s and eight percent in the 1990’s. And yet people still managed to buy and sell homes throughout those years. With that in mind, the rate increases we’re likely to see in 2016 are nothing to fret over.

The increase in the Fed Funds Rate should be taken as a sign that our economy is expanding and is a preemptive move to limit anticipated inflation. While interest rates have risen from their all-time low, they are still remarkably favorable. And will remain so through 2016.

 

Matthew Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, specializing in residential market analysis, commercial/industrial market analysis, financial analysis, and land use and regional economics. He is the former Principal of Gardner Economics, and has over 25 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K. 

Posted on December 17, 2015 at 1:35 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News | Tagged , , , , ,

No national bubble in sight, but there are some frothy markets

 

This article originally appeared on Inman.com 

Earlier this year, I wrote an article called “No housing bubble in sight — for now” in which I shared my belief that the nation, as a whole, is not currently at risk of seeing another housing bubble.

However, I did qualify that statement by saying that I was noticing some “frothy” markets around the country that might be getting a little too hot.

In this article, I plan to divulge those markets that are likely to see slowing price growth in 2016 and possibly a downward correction.

The primary data sources that I used for my analysis were the Case-Shiller Index and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA).

I chose these two providers as they both prepare indices on home values using the repeat sales method. That is to say, they use data on properties that have sold at least twice to capture the true appreciated value of each home.

What the data shows

As I studied these data sets, it became apparent to me that there are some markets that we need to watch. From a very simplistic standpoint, both Case-Shiller and the FHFA indicated a few cities that have already surpassed their peak index levels.

Using the Case-Shiller numbers, these were Dallas, Denver, Portland and Boston. The FHFA data showed Dallas, Atlanta, Charlotte, Portland, San Francisco and Seattle as having surpassed their previous peaks.

While this can certainly be an indicator that a market is getting overheated, it’s not the be-all and end-all because external influences, such as mortgage rates and recessions, can all affect index levels.

Because of this, I thought it was important to take a closer look and focus on those markets that might be tracking above their natural trend.

That’s to say, I looked at pre-bubble growth rates, forecasted that rate forward in time and then compared that number to the present index levels.

After having completed this analysis, San Francisco, Denver and Dallas appear to be appreciating at a faster rate than their historic averages.

Even two indicators that point toward a potential problem don’t guarantee an outcome. Because of this, I decided to round off my analysis by looking at the ratio of home prices to incomes in the market areas that were of interest.

This is another important indicator when determining the health of a housing market as it speaks to affordability.

For the past few years, home values have been rising at rates well above that of incomes, but thanks to low-interest rates, this hasn’t yet created a significant barrier for buyers.

However, mortgage rates are set to rise, and this could leave some markets with homes that are too expensive for buyers earning that area’s median income.

When we look at the world through this lens, the cities where I see a cause for concern are San Francisco, San Diego and San Jose.

So what does this all mean?

Well, for one thing, San Francisco stands out — and not necessarily in a good way. Additionally, several markets have recovered from the housing collapse, and they are getting a little ahead of the rest of the country; specifically Denver and Dallas.

I will be watching these markets closely and anticipate that we might see a relatively steep slowdown in home price growth in these three cities.

The U.S. housing market has spent the past three years in recovery mode with robust demand, tight supply and favorable interest rates, which created a perfect environment for prices to rise — and rise they did.

However, I believe that a select few markets, such as San Francisco, Denver and Dallas, are getting a little out of sync and should start to prepare for an almost certain slowdown in price growth.

Now, if there is any consolation, it’s that the slowdown is supply-driven. If we do not see a significant increase in inventory in these markets, any slowdown in home prices might be offset by persistently high demand. Only time will tell.

 

Matthew Gardner is the chief economist for Windermere Real Estate. Follow him on Twitter @windermere
Posted on December 3, 2015 at 2:17 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News | Tagged , , , , ,

Local Market Update – November 2015

The hot real estate market shows little sign of slowing down. Home prices continued to move upward. With the number of pending sales exceeding the number of new listings, the supply of homes is falling well short of demand. The inventory of homes in the Puget Sound area is 23 percent less than a year ago.

Eastside

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Home prices on the Eastside continue to be well above those in other parts of King County. The median price for homes sold in October was $667,000, an eight percent increase over the previous year. Inventory remains at historic lows, with only a six week supply available – far below the three to six months of supply that is considered to be balanced.

King County

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Inventory remained tight throughout King County with just five weeks of available supply. Limited inventory has fueled home prices, pushing the median price of a home up seven percent over last year to $480,000. Home prices vary significantly based on location. While the median home price was $555,000 in Seattle, the median price was $449,950 in North King County, and $297,824 in Southwest King County.

Seattle

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A recent analysis ranked Seattle as the nation’s #1 hottest market for single family homes. That demand has depleted the supply of homes, which stands at just under one month of inventory. Demand has also kept prices climbing. The median price of a home in Seattle increased eight percent over the previous year to $555,000.

Posted on November 19, 2015 at 2:12 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Know Before You Owe: Making the Mortgage Process Easier for You

This is a great piece from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Learn about the new federal changes enacted this month that add tons of transparency to the mortage loan disclosure process! As always, your comments are welcome!

http://www.consumerfinance.gov/blog/know-before-you-owe-making-the-mortgage-process-easier-for-you/

Posted on October 23, 2015 at 3:31 pm
Denni Shefrin | Category: Market News